The predictability of the Final Cut Pro X response

I’ve been going through old posts on my Indie4K blog (now merged into this blog) to see which of them might be worth migrating to this blog’s archives, and I turned up this, originally posted nearly a year ago (and now living in its new home on this blog). Important bit:

In general, [Apple is] willing to do things that they know people will complain about loudly — but this gives them the flexibility to sometimes make exceptional products.

I suspect this is precisely where they’re headed with FCP. We’re going to get the OpenCL and Grand Central Dispatch goodness that everyone wants. But we’re not going to get an app with a strict superset of Final Cut Pro’s functionality. Instead, we’re going to get an app that Apple believes is better overall for the tasks video editors perform, even if some features are cut. And we might also get a significantly overhauled UI; something that results from a process of sitting down and questioning every assumption about how editing interfaces currently work.

In short, I think they’ll come up with something really interesting… that will probably cause a bunch of people to totally freak out about how Apple has ruined everything and make forceful public declarations about how they’re leaving the platform. Meanwhile, people actually willing to embrace the thing might discover it has a bit of that iPad ‘magic’.

Hmmm….

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6 Responses to The predictability of the Final Cut Pro X response

  1. marcus.sg says:

    “In short, I think they’ll come up with something really interesting… that will probably cause a bunch of people to totally freak out about how Apple has ruined everything and make forceful public declarations about how they’re leaving the platform.”

    I’ve seen a ton of Dummy-Spitting over the last couple of weeks from well-known established posters on a well-known established forum. Are Editors THAT immautre? One Editor rightly told one of the dummy-spitters that he’s behaving like a ‘toy-collector’ with his threat to leave the platform for Avid. You would leave the flexibility of the new product AND the currently shipping one for one that doesn’t offer that? Because somebody picked up and changed your toys? Pffft. Whatever man. Don’t let the door hit you on the way out.

  2. marcus.sg says:

    BTW, You and Craig are lighthouses in the ocean of insanity that is the FCPX pre-launch build up. Keep keepin’ on..

  3. Jon Waters says:

    “BTW, You and Craig are lighthouses in the ocean of insanity that is the FCPX pre-launch build up. Keep keepin’ on..” Totally true. I haven’t seen so much hysteria and so little faith since apple produce a computer without a floppy drive, remember that? How about when apple announced they were releasing a cell phone and a guy from motorola scoffed some comment about apple being out of their depth in the cell phone market, wonder if he still has a job. Before the iPhone, cell phones looked like a phone, now they all look like an iPhone. The iPad is changing the way we use computers and all other computer companies are following, even MS. Apple doesn’t get it wrong much these days. They are pretty good at adding features to software you didn’t even know you needed. Adobe on the other hand could improve so many things in photoshop and AE but have just stuck with the same with each release. Case in point, the ramp effect in AE is just about useless compare to the grad in motion which is just amazingly flexible and easy to use. All these people complaining about the UI being too consumer, is that because it looks easy to understand? That’s the job of a good UI to make interfacing with a machine as easy as possible, so you can focus on the edit itself and hopefully forget the machine is even there.

  4. Thanks for the nice words. I spent all day kind of bummed out – not from the application so much – but from all the people who I knew hadn’t used X or even RTFM. Having just spent about 4 hours playing around with a mac on the left, and my iPad open to the manual on the right, I’ve been feeling better. I may just have to avoid forums for the next few days until 10.6.8 comes out and hopefully a bug patch.

    It’s not perfect, but we’re hearing insanity from people who used to take even incremental updates like FCP 7 with a major grain of salt. I really do dig the concept of editing the more I get into it. The missing items will be replaced. I truly believe that.

    • Stuart says:

      I totally disagree, I don’t think its insanity. Hey, I’m a rabid Apple fan, but if you were awaiting an Adobe-esque upgrade to 64bit and got Final Cut X (I won’t say Pro) then you’d be as upset as everyone else. I personally have been using it since 1.0. Why would Apple drop XML support, third party plugins and numerous other necessary professional aspects of this software? And still call it Pro? They spent a lot of time and money sending people out getting Avid editors (and others) to convert over to FCP in the last few years. And it worked, a lot of them did, for commercials and features. But then Apple releases something that can’t be used in a professional environment for broadcast. IF this is it, what’s the point in calling it Final Cut Pro? And if we are suppose to buy and wait while they fix it so its usable in a professional environment, why bother releasing it till it actually does the work? I have spent many thousands of dollars over the years on upgrading, training, and on third party plugins. All of which I use regularly. I don’t mind retraining for the new 64bit version, in fact, I was excited to do it. But it really is just a 64bit iMovie release. I should have been tipped off by the price.

  5. Pingback: Nice Dissolve Blog | On risk, failure, and the future of Final Cut Pro

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